Disease & Vaccine Information

Who is at Highest Risk for Getting Measles?

Updated July 30, 2022


Measles Rubeola
 
Image source: CDC PHIL

Persons most at risk for developing measles are poorly nourished young children, especially those with insufficient vitamin A, or those whose immune systems have been weakened by HIV/AIDS or other diseases.  Crowded living conditions can also put people at high risk of contracting measles, even in highly-vaccinated populations.   

The vaccine acquired immunity that most mothers pass on to their infants has been found to be much lower and shorter acting than those produced following natural measles infection, placing these infants at higher risk for measles infection.      Children vaccinated prior to the waning of maternal measles antibodies may also be at risk of measles. Published research has determined that vaccination in the presence of maternal antibodies can reduce the effectiveness of the measles vaccine, even after boosting with additional vaccine doses. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: NVIC encourages you to become fully informed about Measles and the Measles vaccine by reading all sections in the Table of Contents , which contain many links and resources such as the manufacturer product information inserts, and to speak with one or more trusted health care professionals before making a vaccination decision for yourself or your child. This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice.

 

 


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